blog

2018-11-13 13:00 culture blog

FilmStruck's closing ignites fears that Hollywood's march toward streaming will erase movie history - Los Angeles Times

The internet has turned aficionados into online detectives, scouring the web for physical copies of obscure film titles.

“What’s happening is the cinema of the 20th century is being erased,” said Wheeler Winston Dixon, a film studies professor at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. “These films vanish from public view because there’s no one there to recommend them.”

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2018-11-13 08:54 culture blog

Anthony Bourdain Takes A Tour Of The Lower East Side In Final 'Parts Unknown': Gothamist

Despite stops at Jean-Georges’ Public Kitchen, Ray's Candy Store, Emilio’s Ballato, John’s of 12th Street, Veselka and more, the food really came secondary to the interviews. Bourdain opened up his rolodex and met up with many key LES figures, including Blondie’s Debbie Harry and Chris Stein, Richard Hell, Lydia Lunch, Fab 5 Freddy, Cro-Mags' Harley Flanagan, publicist Danny Fields, filmmakers Amos Poe and Jim Jarmusch, The Voluptuous Horror of Karen Black’s Kembra Pfahler, and Fishing with John star/painter John Lurie.

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2018-11-11 20:02 books blog

The Great Work: Alchemy and the Power of Words – Emergence Magazine

But the novel I started writing soon transformed itself into something else. A book which I began to write in conventional English became a book written in my own version of Old English, the language which my Anglo-Saxon narrator would have spoken. But this, while it might be the most obviously unusual feature of the novel, was not the most significant surprise the book sprang on me.

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2018-11-11 19:15 books blog

Penguin – Science Fiction Covers: Part 1 - Visual Melt

Penguin Books have always had a strong ethos when it comes to their creative direction, whether utilising the classic minimalist coloured stripe or allegorical illustration, they always hit the mark.

Penguin Science Fiction covers deserve a closer look, in particular the talented creative directors, artists and illustrators that helped shape the way the future looked.

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2018-11-10 16:11 culture blog

▶︎ Kwaidan / 怪談 | Evening Chants

Living in Kyoto for the past two years has deeply influenced his current sound, which is a focus on musically crafting a “Japanese mood” called Meitei (冥丁) (thus, his name). Rich in history, Meitei wanted to borrow this lost “Japanese mood” and incorporate a contemporary spin on it. This led to the creation of Kwaidan (怪談).

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2018-11-08 17:58 mind blog

Photographs by Felix Salazar

They looked like the concrescence of linguistic intentionality put through a kind of hyper-dimensional transform into three-dimensional space

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2018-11-08 17:37 mind blog

Strange Frequencies By Peter Bebergal Author Interview

I realized that technology doesn’t have to mean complex circuits. Technology could be defined as any way in which human beings have materially tried to interact with our environment, with nature, with the spirit world, with the divine. Any time that we are synthesizing the things around us—whether it’s with a crystal to try and peer into a spirit realm like John Dee did in Elizabethan England, or the person who is hacking an FM radio to try and hear spirits—there are so many resonances. It’s not just that they are trying to communicate with spirits, but in some ways what they’re both doing, which I find absolutely fascinating, is taking a material object and using it in a way that it wasn’t necessarily intended for, or using it in a way that isn’t built into the thing itself.

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2018-11-07 11:11 books blog

Talk with me | Aeon

In 1913 the philosopher Ludwig Wittgenstein fled the interruptions and distractions of Cambridge to live as a hermit in Norway. No one knew him there, and he could focus on his work on logic in isolation. It worked. He lodged for a while with the postmaster in Skjolden, a remote village 200 miles north of the city of Bergen, and later had a hut built overlooking the fjord. Alone, he wrestled with the ideas that would metamorphose into his Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus (1921). Anyone who tried to pass the time of day with him got short shrift. ‘Go away! It’ll take me two weeks to get back to the point where I was before you interrupted me,’ he is supposed to have shouted at one local who made the mistake of greeting him as he stood pondering what could not be said.

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2018-11-04 20:30 culture blog

The New Punks of Los Angeles - The New York Times

It’s a new version of the story that punk has told for decades: Alienation breeds creativity breeds community. The music, whether apathetic or politically charged, interactive or combative, is the most honest venue these kids have to communicate their feelings. And they’ve found a crowd that is willing to listen.

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2018-10-23 13:54 tech culture blog

Christie's Will Be the First Auction House to Sell Art Made by Artificial Intelligence | Smart News | Smithsonian

Hugo Caselles-Dupré, one of Obvious’ three co-founders, tells Christie’s Jonathan Bastable that GAN consists of two parts: the Generator, which produced images based on a data set of 15,000 portraits painted between the 14th and 20th centuries, and the Discriminator, which attempts to differentiate manmade and AI-generated works.

“The aim is to fool the Discriminator into thinking that the new images are real-life portraits,” Caselles-Dupré says. “Then we have a result.”

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2018-10-21 10:14 culture blog

The Man Who Saw America - The New York Times

‘‘I decided if I swore off socks, I had more money for books.’’

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2018-10-15 16:38 history blog

Engraved Ostrich Egg Globe is Oldest to Depict the New World - D-brief

The first known globe to include the New World was recently found at a London map fair—an impressive 500 year survival for it being engraved into ostrich eggs.

According to analysis by an independent Belgian scholar, Stefaan Missinne, the globe not only predates the previous record holder—a globe made of copper alloy between 1504 and 1506, now on display at the New York Public Library—but the evidence suggests it was actually the model used to cast that previous record holder.

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2018-09-30 18:00 culture blog

Fred Stonehouse - Gallery

Fred Stonehouse

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2018-09-29 18:01 culture blog

Charles August Albert Dellschau (4 June 1830 Prussia – 20 April 1923 Houston Texas)

In the fall of 1899, Charles A.A. Dellschau (1830–1923), a retired butcher from Houston, embarked on a project that would occupy him for more than twenty years. What began as an illustrated manuscript recounting his experiences in the California Gold Rush became an obsessive project resulting in twelve large, hand-bound books with more than 2,500 drawings related to airships and the development of flight. Dellschau’s designs resemble traditional hot air balloons augmented with fantastic visual details, collage and text. The hand-drawn “Aeros” were interspersed with collaged pages called “Press Blooms,” featuring thousands of newspaper clippings related to the political events and technological advances of the period.

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2018-09-28 12:07 history blog

Why So Many Bog Bodies Show Signs of Violent Death

On display at the Silkeborg Museum, in Denmark, Tollund Man’s visage seems eerily peaceful—if you ignore the noose around his neck.

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